Description

OffSiteOnTime is an extension of SiteTime, an iteration of the performances and activations that took place during the residency at Vermont Arts Council. OffSiteOnTime scenes are grounded conceptually in resilience to a changing process, that one can continually adapt both physically and psychologically to a shifting landscape, be it literal or metaphorical. The scenes are not fixed performances but act as moving research, one that changes according to the environment. The qualities of the site in which a scene takes place dictates both the concept and its performers. One informs the other.

Scene Two: Falling – January 9, 2018 This was the first scene of OffSiteOnTime, Miller and the members of the Performance Lab had been rehearsing for their performance of Falling, to take place at the Vermont Arts Council but the date was pushed back due to extreme cold weather conditions. Yet they had designed and sewn costumes of Tyvek to shelter themselves from the cold, and they were determined to carry on with the performance – even if in an alternate location. They performed this iteration of Falling in the parking lot of The Karma Bird House, in Burlington, Vermont, under the streetlights and cold windy night sky. The dancers moved slowly through the industrial parking lot, wrapped in Tyvek, leaning into and supporting each other’s movements.
Scene Three: Breathing – May 11, 2018 Breathing was a practice in strength and endurance. For two months, dancers worked weekly with trainer Joey Besl at Premiere Strength & Performance in Shelburne, VT. Through the process of rigorous training, dancers learned to push, pull, and hold their own weight for extended periods of time. This iteration of Breathing became a glimpse into their research and process. The audience was equally challenged in strength and resilience as they watched through the tall windows of the private gym forced to stand outside in the cold, while performers worked up a sweat cycling through stretching, lifting, and weight training movements at the same time the UVM Rugby team performed their rigorous weekly training. During the performance, Micah Dudash’s video of Scene Two: Falling was projected on the wall at the entrance of the gym and monitors were set up in the windows streaming close up photos from the training, photographed by Kelly Holt – providing a deeper look into the process of the performance.
Scene Three: Breathing – May 22, 2018 The third iteration of Breathing took place in a stairwell, a former elevator shaft, at the core of The Karma Bird House in Burlington, VT. The dancers sustained their slow movement for 90 minutes as they moved from the the bottom of the stairwell to the top. They held positions, focused on their breath, leaning into one another, supporting themselves and each other through upper body and core strength; building on what they gained from their work with personal trainer Joey Besl at Premier Strength & Performance.

The dancers wore plastic garment bags that were silkscreened with abstracted text, adding an additional challenge during the performance. In contrast to the body’s elasticity and its ability to breathe, the thin plastic was neither elastic nor breathable The condensation and sweat stayed locked between skin and plastic and made the dancers’ breath visible. Leading towards the stairwell, photographs by Kelly Holt and Renee Greenlee of previous scenes were shown on televisions rested on tree stumps.

And in the stairwell, a stack of two televisions showed Micah Dudash’s video of Scene Two: Falling played on a loop throughout the performance. The stairwell was also filled with a sound piece by Alder; layers of musical tracks and field recordings from training sessions created echoes of weights, guiding voices, and exaggerated breaths – giving shape to the space and contrasting the slow pace of the dancer’s movements.
Details

Dancers
Holly Chagnon, Mireya Guerra, Sage Horsey, Lydia Kern, Navah Stein

Photographers Renee Greenlee &Kelly Holt

Video Micah Dudash

Sound Alder Studio

Costume Design and Production Erika Senft Miller

Perspectives